Month: January 2011

Some New Work

OK, I am winning the war on cancer! So I am now focused on getting some writing done. In addition to two courses at Duke and one at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, I am trying to keep the ink flowing (or the electrons as it were). Here are some of my latest efforts. As always, you can see a more complete picture by going to my CV (follow the tab above).

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You’ll need a university library for these two articles:

“Constitution and Fundamental Law: The Lesson of Ancient Athens,” Social Philosophy and Policy 28.1 (2011).

“Xenophon’s Poroi and the Foundations of Political Economy,” Polis 26.2 (2010).

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Here are two recent reviews, in the on-line journal Bryn Mawr Classical Review:

T. Rood, American Anabasis: Xenophon and the Idea of America from the Mexican War to Iraq (London: Duckworth, 2010), for Bryn Mawr Classical Review , 2011.01.33.

J. R. Hale, Lords of the Sea: The Epic Story of the Athenian Navy and the Birth of Democracy (NY: Penguin, 2009), for Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2010.01 57.

Follow this link for all of my BMCR reviews, published under John Lewis as well as John David Lewis (just scroll down to my name):

http://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/by_reviewerL.html

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On January 21 I did a lecture at Duke on “The Moral Character of Exchange in the Ancient World.” This is available as a podcast (audio only) in the post immediately before this one. Or, follow this link to the website of the venerable Professor Michael Munger:

http://michaelmunger.com/Lewis1-21-11.mp3

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You may also look forward to an essay in the forthcoming volume “Ayn Rand: A Companion to her Work and Thought (Blackwell), as well as to a chapter in a forthcoming second edition of the textbook Medical Ethics, edited by M. Baylon titled “There is No ‘Right’ to Health Care.” I am also working on Xenophon’s political tract “Ways and Means” (or, “Poroi,” also translated as “On Revenues”) with a view to its praise of productiveness–and capital investment–as the key to prosperity and success. This is unique in the ancient world, and not well understood today–if current government policy is any guide.
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I am keeping myself busy at conferences as well. I have organized a conference on Values at Duke University. I will also be gracing other conferences with my presence, including UNC-Chapel Hill (on political authority), Wake Forest University (on the Fed), Christopher Newport University (on the classics and America), the Association for Private Enterprise Education (my presentation is on Rand’s We the Living), the Liberty Fund (a conference I initiated on the economist Jean-Baptiste Say), and of course at OCon 2011 (in Florida).

Audio Lecture: The Morality of Exchange in the Ancient World

On Friday, January 12, 2011 I gave a lecture for the Philosophy, Politics, and Economics Program at Duke University.

“The Morality of Exchange in the Ancient World.”

I thank Professor Michael Munger for his kind invitation.

I especially thank the Thomas W. Smith Foundation for the support that made this possible.

HEAR THE LECTURE NOW! via podcast (about 50 minutes long, audio only) thanks to Professor Munger’s awesome mastery of technology:

http://michaelmunger.com/Lewis1-21-11.mp3